Category Archives: Painting

Circle of Friends – Recap

September 17th – October 14thth

Circle of Friends as been the most successful show this year. This exhibition has flown by and our final week of display draws near. I would like to thank Jeremy Mangan personally for putting this show together and Alec Clayton for his intelligent review of the work.

Circle of Friends

Jeremy Mangan and friends shine at Fulcrum

“The Siege of Syracuse” painting by Jean-Pierre Roy. Photo courtesy Fulcrum Gallery

If there are noticeable similarities between the works by the half-dozen artists now on view at Fulcrum Gallery, it is because they are friends who met while living in New York in the early 2000s and have continued to influence each other since – Patrick Berran, Ben Grasso, Jean Pierre Roy, Ryan Scully, Shintaro Okamoto and Jeremy Mangan, all pulled together by Mangan for this show.

What these artists share, beyond skill, inventiveness, and an obvious shared love of art, is a kind of post-modernist surrealistic mindset. Mangan’s whiskey barrels tumbling over a cold waterfall and his luminous treasure chest caught up in tree roots are like modern day René Magrittes; and Roy’s “The Siege of Syracuse” is like a Salvador Dali painting if Dali had expended more energy on art and less on performance.

Berran and Grasso are the exceptions. There is little trace of surrealism in their paintings. Berran is showing three small abstract paintings of overlapping and interlocking squares and rectangles in acrylic and toner. Within each geometric shape is a pattern of squiggly, splatter-like shapes. His color schemes are simple: blue and red in one painting; blue, red and red-orange in another; and a third in tones of brown with overlapping greenish blocks and super-subtle gray and peach transparencies. There is great complexity hidden within the apparent simplicity in Berran’s paintings.

 

Grasso is showing excellent paintings of leaves and flowers with cheery colors in deliberate dabs of paint. They’re like close-ups of tiny sections of Monet landscapes.

Scully paints rock formations and an avocado-like plant in the desert, which are realistic in appearance but highly unlikely to exist in nature. They are classically balanced, smooth as sanded wood, and nuanced in color modulations. ”

Okamoto has two drawings of pod-like formations that are like slightly more abstract versions of Scully’s impossible plant. There’s something evocative and eerie about these.

Roy’s single painting, “Siege of Syracuse,” is a small picture of a man seated in grassy mountains with a copy of Hieronymus Bosch’s “Christ Descent Into Hell” held in his lap. But the Bosch is painted on glass and the man’s knees go into and through it. This is the most surrealistic painting in the show. It is amazingly luminous with intricate details that are hypnotic.

Luminosity is also a hallmark of Mangan’s paintings, which are realistic scenes that are highly unlikely to ever be seen in this world. “Point Marker” pictures a platform standing in water with a huge splash of water behind it (one can’t help but wonder what made the splash) and a broken ladder leading from the water to the top of the platform. “Sending the Barrels” is the one mentioned earlier of wooden whiskey barrels tumbling over a waterfall, and “Treasure for the Taking” is the one with the treasure chest caught up in the roots of a tree. It is believably realistic and natural except for the rays of light shining out of the chest.

There is not a bad painting in this show, and every one is thought-provoking and intriguing.

Circle of Friends, Wednesday & Friday, noon to 6 p.m., through Oct. 14, Fulcrum Gallery, 1308 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Tacoma

 

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Circle of Friends

September 17th – October 14thth
Opening Reception September 17th 6-9 pm

Artist Talk September 18th 5:30 pm
Read the review by Alec Clayton
Opening Night Gallery

 

Patrick Berran – Ben Grasso – Jean Pierre Roy – Ryan Scully – Jeremy Mangan – Shintaro Okamoto

Circle of Friends (from Brooklyn to Tacoma) is an exhibition of painting and drawing curated by Tacoma’s own Jeremy Mangan. These artists met while living in Brooklyn NY in the early 2000s and were bonded by the challenges of their artistic practice. A practice that necessitates the production of compelling artworks in an increasingly noisy and fickle contemporary art world. Jeremy has been influenced by their combined experience, and shares these visions once again through Circle of Friends.

Both Brooklyn and Tacoma have proven themselves as cultural incubators for the development of ideas and artistic thinking. Sharing a similar history both places originate from a marginalized past and have blossomed into an artistic utopia. Fast-forward to the present and the similarities diverge. Today’s Brooklyn is unrecognizable from its humble origins, while Tacoma has evolved at a more sustainable pace, maintaining its original identity.

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*Berran, Grasso, Roy, and Scully still reside and work in Brooklyn; Okamoto in Queens.

Special thanks to the Tacoma Arts Commission and the Tacoma Artists Initiative Program for funding this event.

 

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STRICTLY SACRED

THE ART OF GIRL TROUBLEStrictly_Poster
Gallery Exhibition

September 11th – 14th
Opening Night showcase:
Thursday, Sept 11, 6PM-10PM  $5
(Girl Trouble will be present for a Q and A)

 

Isaac Olsen (voted best Tacoma filmmaker by the Weekly Volcano) hosts this event at The Fulcrum Gallery (voted best Tacoma gallery by the Weekly Volcano) about Girl Trouble, the most celebrated Tacoma band since the sonics.  Considering the ingredients, this is sure to be the very best Tacoma art event of the season!

STRICTLY SACRED: THE ART OF GIRL TROUBLE is an extension of the acclaimed documentary film of the same name.  Directed by Isaac Olsen and premiered at the Seattle International Film Festival, Strictly Sacred chronicles the 3 decades long career of the band using extensive video and audio material.

Girl Trouble has been firmly planted in the Northwest music scene for 30 years, existing on the fringes of Grunge and virtually every other regional movement.  Their uncompromising DIY aesthetic and then-unfashionable allegiance to hometown Tacoma, Washington  has made them a legendary cult-like phenomenon.  During this time, the band produced a wealth of artwork in support of their musical concept, generating every graphic, flyer, album cover, and fanzine completely in-house.

This gallery exhibition collects together all of Girl Trouble’s archives; some featured in the documentary film and some seen here for the first time.  On display will be artifacts from the bands tiny museum-like practice shed, full sized paintings by drummer Bon Von Wheelie, original Wigout fanzine paste-ups, T-shirt art by guitarist ‘Big Kahuna’ Henderson, props and models used in GT videos, the dress once worn by infamous 85 year-old go-go dancer Granny Go-Go, and other historical knick-knacks accumulated over the years.

Limited edition prints of artwork and photography will be available for purchase.  Girl Trouble will be in attendance on Thursday September 11 (opening night)  for a Q and A.

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Constellation – An Overture to the Zodiac –

April 11th – June 13th 2014
Gallery Opening Reception 6 – 9pm April 11th

constallation_baner
“The Enlightenment Cabinet” is a wandering art exhibition curated by artist Yvette Endrijautzki. With its current presentation “CONSTELLATION- an Overture to the Zodiac”, over forty local, national and international artists will introduce their own interpretation of the 12 Zodiac signs, approaching the subject in many different media. From sculpture to illustration, from

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¿What is Truth?

Oil on Linen – New work by Peter Sheesley
April 18th – June 14th 2013
Opening Reception: April 18th 6-9pm

Show CardIn every society the “Artist” plays an essential role as a communicator, offering insight and dimension to common concepts and phenomena. Peter Sheesley speaks to us through his current body of work titled ¿What is Truth? This series of ten paintings are a visual translation of passages selected from religious manuscript. A thoroughly rendered figure is suspended within an ethereal abstract space. The resulting juxtaposition produces a dreamlike pan dimensional quality. Along with the visual juxtaposition Peter explores the concept of the Nude verses Naked. Continue reading

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