Blue Collar / Meet The Artist / Dec 17th

This Thursday Fulcrum Gallery will be open 6-9 pm for arts walk. We are hosting the continuing exhibition of Blue Collar by Adrian Bouchard. Additionally Adrian will be here giving an informal presentation about his artwork and the artistic processes that lead up to this body of work now on display till January 15th

Adrian Bouchard was born in San Luis Obispo, CA, in 1986. He has been drawing since he was two, and has never stopped creating. Adrian specializes in portraiture using acrylic paints, but also loves ballpoint pen. Over the last four years Adrian has partially transitioned from canvas works in favor of painting on vinyl records and metal plates.

Influenced by many different artists and cultures, Adrian draws inspiration from every period of history, with an emphasis on Art Nouveau and Modern Realism. He loves innovation, learning new ways of creating, and is constantly experimenting with his style. Along with mixing media, Adrian typically uses multiple techniques from different eras, so as to not limit himself when it comes to painting.

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Blue Collar

Blue CollarDecember 4th – February 19th
Opening Reception: December 4th 6pm
Artist Talk: December 17th 6pm

Paintings by Adrian Bouchard

Blue Collar is a unique collection of work sourced from the early part of the last century. Period photographs and antique serving platters are wedded, transforming into bold dimensional portraits. Miners, farmers, child workers, and housewives are presented as haunting reflections of hardship and longing juxtaposed within the opulent filigree of service and wealth. Blue Collar reminds us of who we are and where we have come from. This work is especially poignant for today’s culture as we slide into a similar economic dynamic as The Great Depression.

Blue Collar / Meet The Artist

This Thursday December 17th Fulcrum Gallery will be open 6-9 pm for arts walk. We are hosting the continuing exhibition of Blue Collar by Adrian Bouchard. Additionally Adrian will be here giving an informal presentation about his artwork and the artistic processes that lead up to this body of work now on display till January 15th.

 

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Studio Tour 2015

Open StudioPutPut-MiniGolf
Saturday 11-4
Sunday 11-2.

This weekend I will be opening up my studio located in Fulcrum Gallery. Please join myself and Scott Nelson Saturday 11-4 and Sunday 11-2. for a hands on project, a selection of glass working videos, and I the award winning Tacoma Put Put course will be available for play.  Additionally if you enjoy good prices on unique glass gifts I will have a variety of works for sale and I will be offering up Baby Head Cup seconds for sale. Additional pieces of Scott’s current artwork will be on display for Here Now Forever.
Oliver Doriss

For the map of the Tacoma Studio Tour please visit the Official Site.

Tacoma Put Put: A realistic model of Tacoma Washington that doubles as a miniature golf course.

 

 

 

 

work-imageStudio Tour Hands-on activity:

During open studios, Scott Nelson will demonstrate the process of transferring photo images to glass and other media. Anyone who stops by will be able to take part in the process, and will get to take home a small photo keepsake that they have helped to make. Hope to see you there.

 

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Here Now Forever

October 15th – November 28th
Opening Reception: October 15th 6-9pm
Studio Tour: October 17th & 18th
Artist Talk: November 19th 6pm

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New Work by Scott Nelson

It’s a photographers’ job to capture a moment, but how exactly does one “capture” a moment? The act of plucking emotion from within the context of reality and distilling it into an artifact seems an impossible task, yet Scott accomplishes this and more in his new body of work titled “Here Now Forever”. These artworks are trophies distilled from explorations outside of the bonds of time. Some stretched like exotic animal skins; others composed to form their own visual language. Scott’s pieces offer us an omniscient view of existence, unfettered by the limiting perceptions of our physical being.

“I’m fascinated by time and humankind’s relative understanding of it. As an artist I like to step out of that seemingly one-way stream and to explore my own relationship with things considered temporary and permanent.” –Scott Nelson

Studio Tour Hands-on activity:
During open studios, Scott will demonstrate the process of transferring photo images to glass and other media. Anyone who stops by will be able to take part in the process, and will get to take home a small photo keepsake that they have helped to make.

 

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Circle of Friends – Recap

September 17th – October 14thth

Circle of Friends as been the most successful show this year. This exhibition has flown by and our final week of display draws near. I would like to thank Jeremy Mangan personally for putting this show together and Alec Clayton for his intelligent review of the work.

Circle of Friends

Jeremy Mangan and friends shine at Fulcrum

“The Siege of Syracuse” painting by Jean-Pierre Roy. Photo courtesy Fulcrum Gallery

If there are noticeable similarities between the works by the half-dozen artists now on view at Fulcrum Gallery, it is because they are friends who met while living in New York in the early 2000s and have continued to influence each other since – Patrick Berran, Ben Grasso, Jean Pierre Roy, Ryan Scully, Shintaro Okamoto and Jeremy Mangan, all pulled together by Mangan for this show.

What these artists share, beyond skill, inventiveness, and an obvious shared love of art, is a kind of post-modernist surrealistic mindset. Mangan’s whiskey barrels tumbling over a cold waterfall and his luminous treasure chest caught up in tree roots are like modern day René Magrittes; and Roy’s “The Siege of Syracuse” is like a Salvador Dali painting if Dali had expended more energy on art and less on performance.

Berran and Grasso are the exceptions. There is little trace of surrealism in their paintings. Berran is showing three small abstract paintings of overlapping and interlocking squares and rectangles in acrylic and toner. Within each geometric shape is a pattern of squiggly, splatter-like shapes. His color schemes are simple: blue and red in one painting; blue, red and red-orange in another; and a third in tones of brown with overlapping greenish blocks and super-subtle gray and peach transparencies. There is great complexity hidden within the apparent simplicity in Berran’s paintings.

 

Grasso is showing excellent paintings of leaves and flowers with cheery colors in deliberate dabs of paint. They’re like close-ups of tiny sections of Monet landscapes.

Scully paints rock formations and an avocado-like plant in the desert, which are realistic in appearance but highly unlikely to exist in nature. They are classically balanced, smooth as sanded wood, and nuanced in color modulations. ”

Okamoto has two drawings of pod-like formations that are like slightly more abstract versions of Scully’s impossible plant. There’s something evocative and eerie about these.

Roy’s single painting, “Siege of Syracuse,” is a small picture of a man seated in grassy mountains with a copy of Hieronymus Bosch’s “Christ Descent Into Hell” held in his lap. But the Bosch is painted on glass and the man’s knees go into and through it. This is the most surrealistic painting in the show. It is amazingly luminous with intricate details that are hypnotic.

Luminosity is also a hallmark of Mangan’s paintings, which are realistic scenes that are highly unlikely to ever be seen in this world. “Point Marker” pictures a platform standing in water with a huge splash of water behind it (one can’t help but wonder what made the splash) and a broken ladder leading from the water to the top of the platform. “Sending the Barrels” is the one mentioned earlier of wooden whiskey barrels tumbling over a waterfall, and “Treasure for the Taking” is the one with the treasure chest caught up in the roots of a tree. It is believably realistic and natural except for the rays of light shining out of the chest.

There is not a bad painting in this show, and every one is thought-provoking and intriguing.

Circle of Friends, Wednesday & Friday, noon to 6 p.m., through Oct. 14, Fulcrum Gallery, 1308 Martin Luther King Jr. Way, Tacoma

 

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